Tilt shift effects have been showing up more often in photographers’ work recently, but it’s not always clear how they achieved the look. Was it with a large format camera, a tilt shift lens, through free lensing, software, instagram, or with a Lensbaby? We’re proud to offer what we think is the best way to create this effect, and here we’ll briefly explain why.

Photo by Emma Wood

Photo by Emma Wood

The Lensbaby Composer Pro with Edge 80 optic is a lens that tilts on a ball and socket to give you a slice of focus through your image, essentially creating the same effect as a tilt shift lens, or of an old bellows camera where you can change the plane of focus. You can isolate you subject while smoothly blurring out the rest of the image. You can also get two subjects at different distances in focus at the same time, or even get a miniature effect. The Lensbaby does these things with some advantages over other methods of achieving the same type of effect. 

Composer Pro with Edge 80 Optic

Composer Pro with Edge 80 Optic

First of all, it’s simpler and cheaper than using a true tilt shift lens or view camera with bellows. These cameras and lenses can be very technical, and easily cost thousands of dollars.  This type of lens is great for architectural photography, but for everyday use they may not be ideal.

Next, it’s much easier and less risky than free lensing (shooting photos with the lens detached from the camera). If you’ve ever tried this method, you know how difficult it can be, and you definitely know that there’s a good chance you will get dust on your sensor.

Finally, it looks better than mimicking the effect in software, and it gives you more time behind the camera and less time in front of your computer.

Photo by Sherri Davis

Photo by Sherri Davis

So, how will you use this effect in your work? Will you use it enough to warrant getting the lens?

It’s true that our lenses are specialty lenses, at least to some degree. It’s very likely that you will own other lenses in addition to Lensbaby gear. However, that doesn’t mean that you can’t shoot all kinds of things with them, and even use them on every single shoot. With practice, they can excel in any circumstance and really give a uniquely special quality to your photos.

Photo by Nuno Calderia

Photo by Nuno Calderia

Throughout this post you can see some samples of the various ways that some photographers are using the Edge 80. Portraits, lifestyle, weddings, sports, food, travel, nature, and abstract forms are just a few of the subjects that can look great with this lens. If you’re looking for something different in your photos—something to create a magical feeling—the Composer Pro with Edge 80 is worth trying.

photosbyzoe.co.uk

photosbyzoe.co.uk

 

Photo by Emma Wood

Photo by Emma Wood

 

Photo by A Food Centric Life

Photo by A Food Centric Life

 

Photo by Anthony Crawford

Photo by Anthony Crawford

 

Photo by Willie Kers

Photo by Willie Kers

 

Photo by Katrina Stewart

Photo by Katrina Stewart

 

Photo by Kathleen Clemons

Photo by Kathleen Clemons

 

 

Photo by Liz Devine

Photo by Liz Devine

 

Photo by Andrew Evans

Photo by Andrew Evans

 

Photo by Sherri Davis

Photo by Sherri Davis

To learn more and to buy, click here. Or, to try our Edge 80 optic simulator to see how the effect works, click here.